Squatting Criminalised

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Squatting Criminalised

Postby Nick » Thu May 17, 2012 8:16 pm

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Re: Squatting Criminalised

Postby Rich G » Fri May 18, 2012 12:35 pm

There is a fair bit of misinformation about this since its been illegal to take up residence uninvited in someone's home since the 80s at least. This appears to cover empty property too, but since there appears to be no legal definition of squatting things may remain somewhat confused. Taking possession for adverse possession seems to be unaffected if you dont take up residence. [
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Re: Squatting Criminalised

Postby Nick » Fri May 18, 2012 12:39 pm

My understanding was that the law that defines "squatting" doesn't change, but instead of it being a civil matter it can now be dealt with by police and criminal courts.

I'm up for being corrected.
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Re: Squatting Criminalised

Postby Rich G » Fri May 18, 2012 12:46 pm

There was no law defining squatting, only trespass, which is a civil matter unless done with criminal intent.
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Re: Squatting Criminalised

Postby Rob H » Fri May 18, 2012 1:55 pm

clottie wrote: I would welcome it even more if local authorities used their Empty Homes legislation to allow abandoned properties to be returned to the market place for rental or sale.


I have a fundamental issue with this concept in the context of deep seated corruption. In recent years I have seen a number of properties that were historically 'bequeathed' to the people that have been allowed to decline and then sold off by the local authority. One particular high profile incident resulted in private reward monies being put up for the finder of the original deeds. Last known location? You've got it, the local authority. Their stance was that the deeds stated that the building and the land it stood on was left 'for the use of the people of ...' and as such, belonged to them. As the building had been severely vandalised (post poor maintenance - closure - lack of security) it what no longer in the public interest to maintain. As such, they sold the land to a developer for social housing. Arguably, the council tax payers should see a benefit from the income but this is negligible to say the least.

If these rights were championed, I fear that empty homes would be sold, off market to a small number of 'developers' at rock bottom prices with kick backs a plenty.

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